Histology Special Stains: Nervous Tissue (Online Course)

(based on 80 customer ratings)

Author: Tanisha N. Neely, HT(ASCP)
Reviewer: Diana Harrington, BS, HT(ASCP)

This is the final course in the series that will explore special stains used in the clinical histology laboratory. Basic nervous tissue staining mechanisms and classification of nervous tissue elements will be discussed. The material presented details the chemistry, diagnostic application, and staining protocols for special stains used to demonstrate nervous tissue in samples.

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Continuing Education Credits

Objectives

  • Understand basic tissue staining methods used in the clinical histology laboratory.
  • Explain factors that affect dye binding and use to troubleshoot staining issues.
  • Classify nervous tissue elements and identify which dyes will bind to these elements.
  • Demonstrate safe microwave use to perform special staining procedures.

Customer Ratings

(based on 80 customer ratings)

Course Outline

  • Introduction
      • Tissue Staining in the Clinical Histology Laboratory
      • The Biological Stain Commission (BSC)
      • Cellular and intracellular structure of tissue samples cannot be microscopically examined until they are colored by dyes.
      • What are dyes called that are derived through chemical reactions?
  • Basic Staining Mechanisms
      • What Makes a Dye?
      • Factors that Affect Dye Binding
      • Acids, Bases, pH, and Buffers
      • Basophilic and Acidophilic Staining
      • Oxidation and Reduction
      • Acidic dyes contain basic groups that have an affinity for acidic tissue elements.
      • What is the chemical reaction called that results in the removal of electrons from a molecule?
  • Nervous System Overview
      • Classifying Nervous Tissue
      • Functions of Nervous Tissue
      • Neurons: A Visual Overview
      • Histology of the Nervous System: Neurons
      • Histology of the Nervous System: Neurofibrillary Tangles (NFTs)
      • Histology of the Nervous System: Nissl
      • Histology of the Nervous System: Neuroglia
      • Histology of the Nervous System: Myelin
      • The central nervous system (CNS) consists of the brain and spinal cord.
      • Cell processes arising from the neuron cell body consist of which of the following?
  • Special Staining Methods Used to Demonstrate Nervous Tissue
      • Classifying Nervous Tissue Staining Methods
      • Cresyl Echt Violet Staining - Chemistry
      • Cresyl Echt Violet Staining - Diagnostic Applications
      • Cresyl Echt Violet Staining - Staining Protocol
      • Bielschowsky Silver Staining - Chemistry
      • Bielschowsky Silver Staining - Diagnostic Applications
      • Bielschowsky Silver Staining - Staining Protocol
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) Staining - Chemistry
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) Staining - Diagnostic Applications
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) Staining - Staining Protocol
      • Holzer's Crystal Violet Staining - Chemistry
      • Holzer's Crystal Violet Staining - Diagnostics
      • Holzer's Crystal Violet Staining - Staining Protocol
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) - Cresyl Violet Staining - Chemistry
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) - Cresyl Violet Staining - Diagnostic Applications
      • Luxol Fast Blue (LFB) - Cresyl Violet Staining - Staining Protocol
      • Luxol fast blue (LFB) is used to demonstrate neurons and the presence (or loss) of Nissl in nervous tissue.
      • Tissue samples to be stained with Bielschowsky's silver staining protocol should be sectioned at ___ microns.
  • Using the Microwave for Special Staining Procedures
      • Microwaves in the Histopathology Laboratory
      • Tips for Using the Microwave for Special Staining Procedures
      • Safety Precautions for Microwave Usage
      • Containers used in a microwave oven should be tightly sealed to prevent evaporation of the solution.
      • Microwave ovens heat solutions _____ from the inside out.
  • References
      • References

Additional Information

Level of instruction: Intermediate
 
Intended audience:  Clinical laboratory histotechnologists, histotechnicians, and other medical laboratory personnel who have an interest in this subject matter. This course is also appropriate for histology and clinical laboratory science students, pathology residents, and practicing pathologists.  
 
Author information: Tanisha N. Neely, HT(ASCP) is a freelance writer with a work history in histology, microbiology, and pharmaceutical research. Ms. Neely attended Indiana University where she earned a bachelors degree in arts & humanities from the School of General Studies and a Certificate in Histotechnology from the School of Medicine. She is a member of the National Society for Histotechnology and the Indiana Society for Histotechnology.
 
Reviewer information: Diana Harrington, BS, HT(ASCP) is a histotechnologist at The Dermatology Center of Indiana. Since graduating from Indiana University, she has worked in various hospital laboratories as a medical technologist and histotechnologist. Her experience led her to teach IU students as a Clinical Education Supervisor and create the Histotechnology Program as Program Director for Keiser University in Florida.
 
Course description: This is the final course in the series that will explore special stains used in the clinical histology laboratory. Basic nervous tissue staining mechanisms and classification of nervous tissue elements will be discussed. The material presented details the chemistry, diagnostic application, and staining protocols for special stains used to demonstrate nervous tissue in samples. 




Bielchowsky stained cerebellum. Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.


Neuron and Nissl stained with Cresyl Echt Violet.


Glial cells in a rat brain, courtesy Wikimedia Commons.


Luxol fast blue


pH range