Traditional and New Diagnostic Methods for Blood Parasites (by CACMLE) (Online Course)

(based on 34 customer ratings)

Gary Procop, MD, MS

Developed from a teleconference, this CD-ROM self-study uses a structured, self-paced format. The goal of this course is to provide:


  • a review of the parasites that may be encountered in clinical blood specimens;
  • the most appropriate methods and criteria for their detection and identification.

It serves as an excellent resource to educate students or working professionals who are interested in acquiring knowledge in this particular area of microbiology.



Presented in an easy-to-use PowerPoint slide format with corresponding audio, it’s just like being at a live presentation!

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Continuing Education Credits

Objectives

  • Recognize the importance of prompt analysis of blood for the presence of Plasmodium species when there is a clinical suspicion of a possible infection with P. falciparum.
  • Identify Plasmodium faciparum in blood smears and optimally be able to differentiate the four most common Plasmodium species.
  • Identify parasites other than Plasmodium species that may be encountered in a blood film.

Customer Ratings

(based on 34 customer ratings)

Course Outline

  • PowerPoint Slides
      • Traditional and New Diagnostic Methods for Blood Parasites
      • Goal for Course
      • Learning Objectives
      • Course Overview
      • Course Overview, cont.
      • Gary W. Procop, MD, MS
      • Beginning at the Bedside
      • The Approach
      • The Thick Smear
      • The Thick with Parasite
      • The Thick with Parasite, cont.
      • The Approach to the Thin Film
      • A Thorough Exam
      • When examining a thin blood smear for the presence of parasites, you should:
      • Approaching Intraerythrocytic Parasites
      • Examining the size and shape of malarial parasitized erythrocytes, can be a helpful diagnostic feature to establish a species identification.
      • Normocytic vs. Macrocytic RBCs
      • Normocytic Infected RBC
      • Babesia Lifecycle
      • Babesia species
      • Which of the following are intraerythrocytic parasites?
      • Normocytic Infected RBCs - No Extracellular Forms
      • Normocytic Infected RBCs - No Extracellular Forms, cont.
      • Rare infected normal-sized erythrocytes with only small ring forms could indicate infection with which of the following malaria species?
      • Normocytic Infected RBCs - No Extracellular Forms, cont.
      • Plasmodium malariae
      • Plasmodium malariae, cont.
      • Normocytic Infected RBCs - No Extracellular Forms
      • Plasmodium falciparum
      • Plasmodium falciparum
      • Macrocytic Infected Erythrocytes
      • Plasmodium vivax
      • Plasmodium vivax, cont.
      • Plasmodium vivax, cont.
      • Plasmodium vivax, cont.
      • Plasmodium ovale
      • Plasmodium ovale, cont.
      • Plasmodium ovale, cont.
      • Plasmodium ovale, cont.
      • New Methods
      • Lateral Flow Immunoassay Antigen Detection Tests
      • Lateral Flow Immunoassay Antigen Detection Tests
      • Parasitemia Levels and Detection
      • Pros and Cons
      • PCR and High Resolution Melt Curve Analysis - Plasmodium
      • Normalization
      • Results
      • Only Extracellular Protozoa
      • Trypanosoma Lifecycles
      • Trypanosoma cruzi
      • Trypanosoma brucei
      • Side by Side
      • Rare Trypanosome
      • Microfilaria
      • Microfilaria: Wuchereria Lifecycle
      • Differences Important for Identification
      • WHO: Microfilaria Chart
      • Two of the most diagnostic features of microfilaria are:
      • Microfilaria Example - Wuchereria bancrofti
      • Microfilaria Examples - Loa loa & Mansonella perstans
      • Conclusion



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