Transplantation Medicine: Understanding Macrophages to Improve Patient Care (by ASCLS) (Online Course)

Susan Moffatt-Bruce, MD, PhD; Division of Thoracic Surgery, Division of Transplantation, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University Medical Center

Transplantation is a life saving process and it has evolved tremendously over the last 300 years. Currently we are able to better understand the immune system and its response which is absolutely responsible for the success of every transplanted organ. This understanding has come about by many a scientist trying to narrow down which cell exactly is responsible for the process we refer to as rejection which is when the body into which the organ may be transplanted does not accept the organ. The actual cells thought responsible have changed over the years and as such are medications used to arrest or slow these cells down have changed. This course is intended to give an overview of how we have evolved in the field of transplantation, not only clinically but scientifically. A description of major landmark studies and operations will be highlighted followed by a review of the immune system and its cells that have been investigated over the last several decades.

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Continuing Education Credits

Objectives

  • Identify significant events in the timeline of transplant history.
  • List and explain the three types of organ rejection.
  • Discuss the three main groups of immunosuppressants needed for successful organ transplantation.
  • Identify the major types of cells, antigens and proteins that result in immune response leading to transplant rejection.
  • Describe new techniques to look at individual cells in tissue to explore the proteins responsible for transplant rejection.

Course Outline

  • ASCLS presentation
      • Transplantation History
      • Experimental transplantation
      • Innovation in transplantation
      • First successful human transplantation
      • Furthering human transplantation
      • Kidney Transplantation
      • Overcoming immunological barriers
      • Liver transplantation
      • Heart transplantation
      • Dr. Shumway
      • Heart and lung transplantation
      • Organ replacement therapy
      • Heart transplantation
      • Organ rejection
      • Match the cause and response for each organ rejection type.
      • Hyperacute rejection
      • Acute rejection
      • Acute rejection
      • Chronic rejection
      • Immunosuppression
      • History of immunosuppressants
      • Immunosuppressant therapy
      • Which of the following drugs is a calcineurin inhibitor?
      • T-cell inhibition
      • The goal of immunosuppressant therapy is to stop which of the following?
      • Transplant immunology
      • Transplant immunology
      • Macrophages produce chemokines
      • Chemokines
      • Questions remain...
      • Hypothesis
      • T cells and macrophages in rejection
      • MIG and IP-10
      • New genes for chemokine production
      • Chemokine production
      • Macrophage types
      • Results in the mouse heart study showed an increase in which of the following cells in the chronic rejection model?
      • M2 chemokines
      • Laser capture microscopy
      • Laser capture microscopy
      • Laser capture microscopy
      • Laser capture microscopy
      • Future studies
      • Future studies
      • Research summary

Additional Information

Transplantation is a life saving process and it has evolved tremendously over the last 300 years.  Currently we are able to better understand the immune system and its response which is absolutely responsible for the success of every transplanted organ. This understanding has come about by many a scientist trying to narrow down which cell exactly is responsible for the process we refer to as rejection which is when the body into which the organ may be transplanted does not accept the organ.  The actual cells thought responsible have changed over the years and as such are medications used to arrest or slow these cells down have changed.  This course is intended to give an overview of how we have evolved in the field of transplantation, not only clinically but scientifically. A description of major landmark studies and operations will be highlighted followed by a review of the immune system and its cells that have been investigated over the last several decades.




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